A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music
by
George E. Lewis
(University of Chicago Press; Chicago)

Footnotes

47. Dominique-Rene De Lerma, ed., “The Impact of the AACM in the Twentieth Century: A Panel Discussion” (transcript, Center for Black Music Research, Chicago, Illinois, 1990), 13.
 48. Leslie Rout, Jr., “AACM: New Music (!) New Ideas (?);”Journal of Popular Culture 1 (1967), 138.
 49. Ibid., 129.
 50. Ibid., 136.
 51. Ibid., 131.
 52. Ibid., 129.
 53. Ibid., 134.
 54. Ibid., 136.
 55. Ibid.
 56. Ibid., 137–38.
 57. Ibid., 137.
 58. Ibid.
 59. Amina Claudine Myers, “A Day in the Life . . . . . . . . . . . By Ariae,” manuscript, unpaged, collection of Amina Claudine Myers, 1967[?].
 60. Joseph Jarman, Black Case, vols. 1 and 2, Return from Exile (Chicago: Art Ensemble of Chicago Publishing Company, 1977), 76.
 61. Muhal Richard Abrams, The Dream, audiotape, 1968, collection of Muhal Richard Abrams.
 62. Ibid. Transcribed by the author.
 63. Joseph Jarman, As if It Were the Seasons (Delmark DD-417, 1968), compact disc.
 64. One such session featured McCall, Lester Bowie, Roscoe Mitchell, and bassist Scotty Holt: Nick Gravenites, Whole Lotta Soul/Drunken Boat (Out of Sight Records, 1965), vinyl disc. See Dan Plonsey, Roscoe Mitchell Discography (Preliminary) (2003 [accessed July 4, 2006]); available from http://www.plonsey.com/beanbenders/Roscoedisco.html. According to Plonsey, this recording was Mitchell’s first.
 65. John Litweiler, “Caught in the Act: Roscoe Mitchell,” Down Beat, July 25, 1968, 30.
 66. Ted Panken, radio interview with Roscoe Mitchell (WKCR-FM, New York City, December 5, 1995 [accessed November 30, 2005]), transcript, available from http://www.jazzhouse.org/library/. For an account of the Asian American improvisation movement, see Wong, Speak It Louder.
 67. John Litweiler, “The New Music,” Coda , Jluly 1968, 35.
 68. “Potpourri [Announcement of Steve McCall in Germany],” Down Beat, November 14, 1968.
 69. Maurice McIntyre, “The A.A.C.M.,” New Regime 1, no. 1 (1968): 2.
 70. McIntyre, “The A.A.C.M.,” 1.
 71. Lester Bowie, “A Word from the Desk,” New Regime 1, no. 1 (1968): 5.
 72. Ibid.
 73. Ibid.
 74. Ibid.
 75. Henry Threadgill, “Where Are Our Critics?” New Regime 1, no. 1 (1968): 11.
 76. Ibid., 12.
 77. Anthony Braxton, “24–70°,” New Regime 1, no. 1 (1968).
 78. Ibid.
 79. Joseph Jarman, “On Questions Asked of Me by Jerry Figi on Our Music,” New Regime 2 (1968): 18.
 80. Jack Cooke, review of Lester Bowie recording, Numbers 1&2, Jazz Monthly 162., August 1968, 12.
 81. Terry Martin, “The Chicago Avant-Garde,” Jazz Monthly 157, March 1968, 12.
 82. Ibid., 17.
 83. Ibid., 14.
 84. Ronald M. Radano, New Musical Figurations:Anthony Braxton's Cultural Critique, Chicago; University of Chicagp Press, 1993; 25.
 85. Lawrence Kart, review of Roscoe Mitchell recording, Congliptious, Down Beat, February 6, 1969, 26.
 86. Max Harrison, review of Roscoe Mitchell recording, Congliptious, Jazz Monthly 171, June 1969, 28.
 87. Ibid., 29.
 88. Ibid., 28.
 89. Will Smith, review of Roscoe Mitchell recording, Congliptious, Jazz & Pop, August 1969, 26.
 90. Lester Bowie, Numbers 1&2 (Nessa N-1, 1967), compact disc. Transcription by the author.
 91. Ibid.
 92. Despite being released under Bowie’s name, the album presented two compositions by Roscoe Mitchell, according to Mitchell.
 93. Michael James, review of Lester Bowie recording, Numbers 1&2, Jazz Monthly 160, June 1968, 16.
 94. Ibid. Suzanne K. Langer’s well-known aesthetic theory of “significant form” is worked out in her 1942 opus, Philosophy in a New Key: A Study in the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1942). The theory was further developed in Suzanne K. Langer, Feeling and Form: A Theory of Art . . . (New York: Scribner, 1953).
 95. Cooke, review of Lester Bowie recording, Numbers 1&2.
 96. Ibid.
 97. Jack Cooke, review of Richard Abrams recording, Levels and Degrees of Light; and Joseph Jarman recording, Song For, Jazz Monthly 166, December 1968, 12.
 98. Michael Robinson, “The Association: The ‘New Thing’ Is Their Thing,” Chicago Tribune, Sunday Magazine, November 24, 1968.
 99. Quinn, Bill “The AACM: A Promise,” Down Beat Music '68, 1968, 46.
 100. Ibid.
 101. Ibid., 48.
 102. Ibid., 46. The diversity mentioned in the article included women only to a limited extent. The article mentions vocalists Sandra Lashley and Sherri Scott, and a cellist, Caroline Revis. Curiously, Claudine Myers, who was active at this time, is not mentioned.
 103. Ibid.

> back to The Book Cooks

> back to contents